Positive Transitions

Some of these funding programmes remain temporarily closed to new applicants. In the interim, transition funding is available for eligible organisations for up to two years.

What we want to achieve

At City Bridge Trust we want to help Londoners experiencing inequality and disadvantage to make important transitions in their lives. We want to enable these transitions to be positive for the individuals, give them greater choice and control over their lives and result in a reduction in inequality within communities.

What we want to change

By awarding Positive Transitions grants we want to achieve the following outcomes:

  • Londoners experiencing inequality or disadvantage are supported to become more independent.
  • Vulnerable and disadvantaged Londoners are more resilient and empowered to make positive choices.
  • Vulnerable and disadvantaged Londoners are better able to access specialist support services.

What we will fund

Applications must be for one of the Trust’s Positive Transitions priority areas, listed below. These priorities will be subject to review throughout the lifetime of Bridging Divides to make sure we best achieve our outcomes.

We welcome applications for up to five years funding and core funding will be considered.

Specialist support services for children and young people

We can support specialist support services working with children and young people:

  • Affected by domestic abuse
  • With mental health needs
  • In care moving into adulthood
  • Who are carers

To apply for interim funding, see Transition Funding

If you are seeking funding to support disabled young people transitioning into adulthood please see our programme for Deaf and Disabled Londoners (below).

Support for refugees, asylum seekers and migrants

Support for refugees, asylum seekers and migrants to access mainstream services and widen participation in the communities in which they live

Open to new applicants

We support refugees, asylum seekers and migrants to thrive and participate fully in their communities. We do this by funding organisations which are working to tackle the barriers they face, and providing access to resources

Such work can include mental and physical health support, provision of legal services, assistance with housing and educational needs, and much more.

As part of our commitment to tackle the root causes of inequality, we do not just fund services, but also other activities including influencing, raising voices, and ensuring representation. Where we can, we will also look to support organisations working with refugees, asylum seekers and migrants by drawing on our own extensive networks and assets.

If you are applying for funding to run ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) classes, please note that we will only support classes at Pre-Entry Level and Entry Levels 1,2 and 3, for adults who are not otherwise accessing mainstream ESOL provision. Teachers must have a recognised ESOL qualification, such as those listed on the TESOL website.

We particularly welcome applications from organisations led by people with direct experience of the UK immigration system.

Based on grants made to date, we have awarded between £2,000 and £300,000 for work under this strand. The average award size has been £110,000. Please note that these figures are illustrative only, and that we can award more or less than these amounts depending on the applications we receive.

If you are seeking funding for immigration advice services please see our Advice and Support programme

Support and services for Deaf and Disabled People

Support and services for Deaf and Disabled People to increase choice and control in their lives

Open to new applicants

We recognise the social model of disability and want to fund work which removes or reduces the barriers preventing disabled people (including people who are experiencing long-term mental health difficulties) from participating in society and living independently.

Examples of the types of work we will fund include: participation in the arts, inclusive or adapted sports activities, health & well-being opportunities, support with the transition to adulthood and evidence-based employment programmes.

As part of our commitment to tackle the root causes of inequality, we do not just fund services, but also other activities including influencing, raising voices, and ensuring representation. Where we can, we will also look to support your work by drawing on our own networks and assets.

We particularly welcome applications from Deaf and Disabled People’s Organisations (DDPO). Based on the criteria used by Inclusion London, an organisation is a DDPO if:

  1. Its Management Committee or Board has at least 75% of representation from Deaf and Disabled people and;
  2. At least 50% of its paid staff team are Deaf and Disabled people with representation at all levels of the organisation and;
  3. It provides services for, or work on behalf of, Deaf and Disabled people.

(We support advice services through our Advice and Support programme)

Based on grants made to date, we have awarded between £5,000 and £266,000 for work under this strand. The average award size has been £115,000. Please note that these figures are illustrative only, and that we can award more or less than these amounts depending on the applications we receive.

Specialist support services for older people

Specialist support services for older people, including people with dementia, to increase choice and control in their lives.

To apply for interim funding, see Transition Funding

Tackling abuse, exploitation and hatred

Open to new applicants

We want all Londoners to live safe lives with dignity and respect. We therefore support work that prevents abuse, exploitation and hatred, as well as services that assist survivors.

We can fund organisations supporting the survivors of all types of abuse (including physical, sexual, emotional, economic coercion or neglect). We are particularly keen to fund work tackling male violence against women and girls and to support work with the LGBTQIA+ community and other communities which face barriers to appropriate provision. We also fund organisations working with perpetrators.

We fund work to address modern slavery (where people are illegally exploited for personal or commercial gain) and trafficking (where people are traded for purposes of exploitation).

We support work to tackle crime motivated by hostility based on race, religion, nationality, disability, sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity.

We particularly welcome applications from organisations led by people with direct experience of the issues involved. We are particularly keen to fund work with the LGBTQIA+ community, and other communities which face barriers to mainstream provision.

As part of our commitment to tackle the root causes of inequality, we do not just fund services, but also other activities including influencing, raising voices, and ensuring representation. Where we can, we will look to support your work by drawing on our own networks and assets.

Based on grants made to date, we have awarded between £28,000 and £283,000 for work under this strand. The average award size has been £135,000. Please note that these figures are illustrative only, and that we can award more or less than these amounts depending on the applications we receive.

Criminal justice: building settled lives for those leaving custody or serving community sentences

Open to new applicants

We want to fund services which prepare people for release from the custodial system or who are reaching the end of community sentences.

We want to support people in this transitional period and reduce the risk of further prison or community sentences.

We are particularly interested to fund:

  • Work that informs and advises people of the services available to them on release
  • Work at specialist premises that support especially marginalised individuals, such as women who have survived domestic abuse
  • Safe and secure housing
  • Access to employment or self-employment opportunities

We can support work taking place in prison and in young offenders’ institutions, but this must be preparatory to the transition around release.

Where work takes place in custody, this should either be in facilities within Greater London or where the beneficiary groups are Londoners.

We are also interested to fund work advocating evidence-based alternatives to custody as well as work looking to tackle inequalities in custodial sentencing.

Where we can, we will look to support funded work by drawing on our own networks and assets.

Based on grants made to date, we have awarded between £45,000 and £154,000 for work under this strand. The average award size has been £87,000. Please note that these figures are illustrative only, and that we can award more or less than these amounts depending on the applications we receive.

Mental health support and homelessness issues

Services which improve the accessibility and range of mental health support and services for people who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness or are vulnerably housed

We understand that mental health is one of the most difficult needs for people experiencing homelessness to access support for, with limited access to mental health workers and assessments. City Bridge Trust recognises that working with rough sleepers and people experiencing homelessness requires specialist knowledge and capacity and as such is keen to support approaches providing a range of therapeutic interventions/services which are trauma informed and recognise the need to be flexible to meet the specific needs of people experiencing homelessness and which build on current good practice.

To apply for interim funding, see Transition Funding

Applications for funding

To learn more about making an application for Positive Transitions funding, please visit our How to apply page.